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Archaeological Sites in Australia

  • Guardian Place, Yam Camp, Shepherd Creek Secret Place, and Emu Dreaming Galleries - Aboriginal Rock Art sites in Northern Queensland The rock art of Guardian Place, Yam Camp, Shepherd Creek Secret Place, and Emu Dreaming Galleries consists of paintings of Quinkan figures, spirit figures, humans, paintings based on yams, a wallaroo and fruit bats, as well as cupules and other engravings in the sandstone.
  • Pine Tree Creek, Tied Up Wrist and Wallaroo Galleries - Aboriginal Rock Art sites in Northern Queensland The rock art of Pine Tree Creek, Tied Up Wrist and Wallaroo Galleries consists of paintings of kangaroos and wallabies, eels, people dancing, and Quinkan figures, and hand stencils of two hands at each end of a wrist. 
  • Quinkan Corner, the Rock Wallaby Gallery, and Tent Shelter Gallery - Aboriginal Rock Art sites in Northern Queensland The rock art of the Quinkan Corner, the Rock Wallaby Gallery, and Tent Shelter Gallery, consists of Quinkan figures, animal figures of many kinds, but including birds, kangaroos, platypus, and dingoes, as well as human and ancestor figures. It is of great importance in the study of the art of Northern Queensland.
  • Sandy Creek Aboriginal Rock Art Site, near Laura, Northern Queensland.
  • Laura River bed, near the Bridge - an Aboriginal Rock Art site in Northern Queensland
  • Brady Creek and the nearby galleries - an Aboriginal Rock Art site in Northern Queensland
  • Fossilised Human Footprints in Australia
  • Aboriginal art on the Northern Tablelands of NSW Australia, including a lizard, a snake, and hand stencils.
  • Aboriginal Art of the Kimberleys
  • Carnarvon Gorge : Carnarvon Gorge lies within the spectacular and rugged ranges of Queensland's central highlands. Lined with vegetation and fed by the waters of numerous side gorges, Carnarvon Creek winds between towering sandstone cliffs. The gorge is a cool and moist oasis within the dry environment of central Queensland. The fragile aboriginal art on the gorge's sandstone walls reflects a rich culture. Ochre stencils of tools, weapons, ornaments and ceremonial objects, as well as engravings and grooves where tools were sharpened provide an insight into the lives of the gorge's first people.
  • Naracoorte Caves : Naracoorte Caves in South Australia is in an area of limestone in which ground water has dissolved some of the limestone, creating the caves. The caves are often not far below ground, and holes opened up creating traps for the unwary. This is the source of the remarkable collection of fossils. Mammals and other land creatures have fallen into the sink holes and been unable to escape. The fossil record has been preserved in strata formed from eroded topsoil washed and blown in. In some places, the fossil-bearing silt is up to 20 metres thick. Some of these areas are being preserved for future research when better methods of dating and reconstructing fossil records may have been found. These fossil traps are especially significant for tracing Australian megafauna.
  • Lake Mungo is the site of the oldest human remains in Australia
  • Mt Yarrowyck : The Mount Yarrowyck Nature Reserve near the junction of the Armidale Road and Thunderbolts Way protects an Aboriginal cave painting site and much of the natural environment of Mount Yarrowyck. The reserve's Aboriginal cultural walk, a three kilometre return track, will take you along the granite slopes of the mountain to the cave painting site. 

Cuddie Springs Archaeological Site, New South Wales

A unique material record of the prehistory of the south-eastern region of Australia over the last 50,000 years.

The long history of Indigenous Australians is documented in numerous archaeological sites throughout Australia. Archaeological sites are localities where the material evidence of past human activity is preserved. They include camping sites, quarries and ceremonial sites. The evidence, in the form of artefacts, remnants of various craftworks, bones of consumed animals, rock art and ceremonial arrangements, carved trees and fireplaces, can be found on the land surface or beneath in stratified positions. Sites with stratified materials have greater potential for revealing a chronology of past events and the sequence of cultural and environmental changes over time.